David Stromberg - Cello

„The magic of fascinating cello art“, „contemplativedepth“, „Premonitionoffulfilled aesthetic Utopia“, the Süddeutsche Zeitung wrote about David Stromberg.

Stromberg studied at the Music University of Hamburg with Prof. Wolfgang Mehlhorn and the Music Institute Castle Edsberg/Stockholm with Prof. Frans Helmerson. Other major influences were master classes with Boris ...

„The magic of fascinating cello art“, „contemplativedepth“, „Premonitionoffulfilled aesthetic Utopia“, the Süddeutsche Zeitung wrote about David Stromberg.

Stromberg studied at the Music University of Hamburg with Prof. Wolfgang Mehlhorn and the Music Institute Castle Edsberg/Stockholm with Prof. Frans Helmerson. Other major influences were master classes with Boris Pergamenshikov, Ralph Kirshbaum, Wolfgang Boettcher, Dimitri Ferschtman, Siegfried Palm and Ralph Gothoni. He visited baroque cello courses with Kristin von der Goltz.

His CD „Transition“, produced in co-operation with Deutschlandradio Kultur, was released on Ars Produktion. Stromberg recorded this project with the principal winds of the Hamburg Philharmonic, performing Schumann’s Cello Concerto, Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations as well as his own arrangements of other romantic works with wind quintet, published by Sikorski. This production was chosen CD of the week with SWR, and won enthusiastic critical acclaim on NDR, SWR and printed media like Concerti, Die Welt, Wiener Zeitung and Sonic magazine. The „Transition“ project was successfully performed at festivals like the Quedlinburger Musiksommer, Kunst-und Kulturtage Wetzlar, Meßdorfer Musiktage, internationales Musikfest Lübeck, Ravensburg, Schloss Ismaning, Villach/Austria and Neuenhagen/Berlin.

He additionally specializes in both period performance and contemporary repertoire.


I am looking forward to the students of the International Violin Academy Hammelburg and the exciting workshops
David Stromberg Guest Lecturer International Violin Academy Hammelburg

Workshop Improvisation of cadances

At the time of Viennese Classicism, it was common practice for soloists to improvise the cadenzas in solo concerts on the spur of the moment. They played freely with the motifs of the concert, could modify them as they pleased, combine them in new ways and develop them further. But they also had to observe rules.

Today, musicians are usually unfamiliar with improvising cadenzas. Our course revives this tradition and teaches rules for these improvisations. It is only a small step from improvising cadenzas to their written fixation in note form. The writing of cadenzas thus succeeds in the interaction of spontaneous inspiration and knowledge of harmony progressions and structure. With such experience, the interpretation of written cadenzas becomes even more coherent, because the musician has gained a new understanding of the matter.

He has experienced the improvisational element in this process and can perform concert cadenzas in a quasi improvised manner from this spirit. And those who dare to improvise the cadenzas in concert will refresh the audience and the other players, offer unheard-of musical liveliness and, in addition, allow the composed parts of the concert to appear in a new context.

www.davidstromberg.de